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and revenue growth? clarification from washington. a grand bargain encompassing a deficit reduction for ten years like tax reform and titlement reform. discretionary titlement reform. and debt extension for maybe two years. first, the recession needs it stabilize there. but a clear road to fiscal, banking reforms and indication that europe is serious about improving competitiveness. third, resumption of growth in emerging economies led by china. finally, the fed successfully engineering a modest increase in interest rates without unleashing run away inflation. i know, tall orders. >> this is a tall order, bob. >> but this would create a huge boost of business confidence. capital expenditures and hiring would increase and revenues would rise. finally, sue, on a day when the dow passed 14,000, it is forth while noting that the last time the dow passed 14,000, valuations were much higher with the ratio for the s&p at that time was 22. about 14 right now. what does that mean? well, historic average for the s&p 500 is 15, it means the market was way overvalued, sue, in 2007. today it is somewhat
apiece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what are you trying to say about that? guest: we usually do not talk about trust deficits. talk about trade, budget deficits, things we can measure. i'm talking about a breakdown of trust in american society, in particular in the institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys like a gallup or the pugh institute -- the pew institute, or even newspapers, congress, large corporations, banks, public schools, they have all been going down for many years. for a lot of them, this decline in trust was intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis. there are a lot of reasons for these things we can talk about. what we were trying to get at in the story that -- is that this matters to the economy, and trust breaks down. there was nobel prize-winning economist who 40 years ago said that every commercial transaction has within it an element of trust. when you trust your counter party, you're more likely to engage in a transaction. when trust begins to fray, and people become suspicious
the deficit instead of worried about wall street. this consumer financial bureau, the protection bureau, set up under elizabeth warpen, this focus on regulating banks the reality that we had been raided by wall street, that all of that got turned around so that instead, it somehow became a govpt deficit problem when it was never that. >> and it was that deregulation that caused us to have a problem. and dana, if we go back, because a lot of people forget where we came from and how we were able to overcome some insurmountable odds to get where we are today even though we have a long way to go. if you go back to when president obama came into aufsz office, 2009, on the eve of february 2009 jobs report, which turned out to be the worst in 34 years, the president called for action on the stimulus package. let me show you what the president said. >> the time for talk is over. the time for action is now. because we know that if we do not act, a bad situation will become dramatically worse. and i refuse to let that happen. we can't delay and we can't go back to the same, worn out ideas that let d u
to continue pushing the government to cut the fiscal deficit by reviewing social security spending. the budget is a lingering concern for lawmakers. they must come up with measures to resolve the issues of spending cutby ely mch. here in japan the jobless rate in december has gotten worse. the number of jobs on offer for people seeking work has seen the first increase in five months. the latest data from the internal affairs ministry shows unemployment for december was 4.2%. that's up .1 of a point from december. the number of people without a job increased by 70,000 to 27.8 million. those with a job fell 350,000 to 62.6 million. as for thehole of 2012 the job situation improved. the average unemployment rate last year stood at 4.3%. that's down .3 of a point from the previous year. the labor ministry announced that the ratio of job vacancies to seekers improved slightly in december. it says 82 position were available for every 100 job seekers. the weak yen and rising share prices are behind an increasingly attractive japane equity market. they have seen earnings swing back into black. japan's
and uninsured health costs. the shortfall the average savings deficit for a single female is little over $133,000. that's the additional amount a single female would on average need to save by age 65 to eliminate the shortfall. the recent economic crisis has made it even more difficult. the low contribution rates and the lack of understanding of the need for the comprehensive retirement strategy means inadequate income for the rest of your life. these issues are compounded in addition to living longer older women are likely to have costly chronic medical conditions and need longer-term institutional care. further women are likely to be single at some point in their lives which puts them at a high risk for poverty and it is an irony of the latest stage of life many women become poor for the first time in their life. today the rate of harmony for women 65 and over is close to 11%. in my testimony i have a lot more numbers but what i would like to point out is of those numbers once you get to single women almost a third and for the hispanic women it is 44% which is just the enormous. another twi
out of washington to get our deficits under control. hopefully, we do not have to many quarters where we end up in negative territory. this is not an economy growing six percent and can hinder those bibles easily. host: magnolia, texas, david, better. caller: [indiscernible]we are doing great here. i noticed the super bowl is forming dollars per minute. everything is packed. all of the football stadiums. i do not see any recession. host: you said you are doing better why? caller: i live 15 miles from where they are building the number one country in the world. we are getting roads. it is unbelievable around here. we have job signs everywhere. as far as the savings, when interest rates are 1.5%, who will put their money in the bank? bernanke wants you to put it in stocks. that is why there is no interest rate. i took my money for years ago when i bought those rifles. i have made so much money on them. it is unbelievable. host: he mentioned social security. there is a category about the social safety net. guest: we use the term government social benefits to cover quite a few different p
washington, a grand bergan encompassing deficit reduction with tax reform, entime reform and deschristianry spending reforms in areas like debt. extension of the debt ceiling for two years. clarification on europe. first, the recession needs to stabilize, but beyond that, policy initiatives clearly indicate a road to political and fiscal and banking reforms and an indication that europe is serious about improving competitiveness. resumption of growth in emerging economies, like china, and finally the federal successfully engineering a modest increase in interest rates without unleashing runaway inflation. maria, these are tall orders, i know, but resolution of all these issues would be a huge boost to business confidence, capital expenditures and hiring would increase dramatically and revenues would rise, and that's what we need, maria. back to you. >> that's some list, bob. >> pretty ambitious. >> we'll be watching that. not everybody is buying into this bull market theory, by the way. pimco's bill gross is actually warning investors to be afraid, and i mean very afraid, of how inflation a
job growth in january. >>> plus, the dutch finance minister warns of a worsening deficit this year, this after the government is forced to bail out local banks after a bailout of 3.7 million euros. >>> we kick off with the pmis out of the eurozone. january manufacturing pmi, 47.9. the flash 47.5, december manufacturing pmi was 46.1. it has boosted the euro to maintain its gaze, now back over to 1.3651 and continuing to climb high. that is now a 32-month high against the yen, as well, at 11.25965. the german manufacturing pmi was a little better, as well, this morning. helping to boost those numbers. we suggest that there's benefits from emerging markets rather than, perhaps, from elsewhere in europe. anyway, coming in better once again for the eurozone. still in contraction territory, but, of course, the trend is what is being concentrated on. we had similar indicators for two die verging views on china's recovery. eases to 50.4 for january, that was below the forecast of 5079 the. but a private survey showed growth at a two-year high. the final hsbc pmi up 52.3. which is an inch a
into further deficit and debt. >> obviously democrats would prefer a longer suspension of he debt ceiling which would provide additional economic security and stability as we continue to find ways to decrease the deficit. raising the possibility that the u.s. could default its obligations every few months is not an ideal way to run government but a short term solution is better than another imminent manufactured crisis. >> holman: the house already passed the bill. without it, the government would default on its obligations as early as mid-february. in economic news, americans' personal income grew in december, by the most in eight years. but first-time claims for jobless benefits were up last week. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 50 points to close at 13,860. the nasdaq fell a fraction of a point to close at 3,142. blinding snowfall and a slick freeway triggered a mile-long series of crashes in detroit today. at least three people were killed and 20 more injured. the pileups left a section of interstate 75 littered with wrecked cars and big-rig trucks. th
the economy and put us on a sustainable budget, bring our deficits down in a responsible, balanced way. >> does the president -- considering what the defense cuts did to the contraction of the u.s. economy in the fourth quarter, dois the president goi to be more aggressive in trying to find a way to stop the so-called sequester, the automatic defense cuts that would go through, which could it looks like now -- we already know the economic impact defense cuts have had last quarter. these would obviously slow down the economy even more. is the president going to refocus on this. >> the president has been focused on this for some time. the president made a submission to the super committee a year ago or so, which would have reduced our deficits in a balanced way, eliminated the sequester and his negotiations with the congress on the fiscal cliff. he did the same thing. so this is something that the president has provided a plan. the sequester is bad policy. it's something that we should eliminate. it wasn't intended to take place. and we got a taste for the impact that the sequester might
washington journal they talk about the recent article suggesting that a trust deficit by americans toward government and financial sector could be holding back the economic recovery. my cartoons depict can da that and humor. why started the cartoon, they were native characters and native situations. and my audience was geared toward natives. in the last four or five years they have become more universal where they stilled to the mainstream dominant culture. it's more universal now. i'm inspired by the people that are that i grew up with. my friend, my family, members of my tribe. and basically watching people and some of the things they do. it's surprising, if you pay attention to what people do and what people say, there's a lot of humor you can find in that, you know, making your own twists and certain things. >> people who have read my cartoons for the first time. i hope they take with them the appreciation of a native culture and native way of life. because it's not always depicted correctly in cinema or in books. but this cartoon coming from a genuine native american and these are my
spending, investments in military power, reinvest it elsewhere. not so much cut the deficit, but use the money saved for his priorities, his domestic priorities. closer? >> yeah. >> okay. >> oh, no, i just want the mic back. closer to me. this is the problem with us having three mics, and i apologize. tom, i just want to push you on a question and then actually segway to fred to talk about the wars we theoretically can fight. part of the problem is the notion that we don't have wars that we want to fight, and that is in some ways an acceptable notion. a man who was elected as commander and chief, and he gets to make those decisions. the american people voted him into office, and in some ways the president is absolutely right to suggest that he has a mandate in these areas. the real question is the impact that these decisions have on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history, we don't talk about this very much, we have maintained a strong military not so that we can fight, but so that we cannot fight. and the other point i think that tom made and this is
rainfall deficit for january, 4" below normal in san francisco. more than two for san jose and livermore. looking live outside it's fitting we're wrapping up january on a dry note. when does the rain come back? the answer in your forecast next. >> and the star of the super bowl halftime show takes the stage early. how beyonce quickly drowned out her critics. [ singing live ] at least 14 people are dead and 80 injuried in a massive explosion at mexico's state- owned oil company's headquarters. aerial m the pemex facili >>> 14 people are dead in mexico city and 80 missing. aerial pictures from the pemex facility show lines of fire trucks and emergency vehicles. the local media is reporting exploding machinery as the case of the blast. the company has a heft of deadly accidents including one in september that killed 30 people in a gas facility in the northern part of the country. >>> california came a long way to dig out of debt. stand and poors raised its assessment of more than $80 billion worth of state bonds from a minus to an a. it's the
some handle on the deficit problem going forward. >> you're part of the fix the debt organization trying to get congress to concentrate on entitlement reform. you have said in that capacity, in the end we're going to have to eliminate some programs. could some health care programs be included in that? >> both parties realize that they have to reorganize not simply cut deeply these entitlement programs. they serve a population that's very vulnerable. you have to be careful about shifting costs because they affect poor people and old people and disabled people in very different ways than they do the rest of us who have somewhat growing incomes. >> big transformation from the health care reform law really is next year in 2014, with the individual mandates and the state health exchanges to try to expand the coverage. 23 states have instead said that they want the federal government to run those exchanges. is that good participation? >> some of this may be transitional, to be fair to the states. they're taking on the medicaid population, which is their platform that they know a lot abo
deficit. >>> it's another first tied to the catholic church abuse scandal. the archbishop of los angeles ordered roger mahony to stop performing any public church duties because of his connections to that scandal. this game after the archdiocese released private files of priests suspected of molesting children. the decision on this came yesterday after years of lawsuits and very emotional legal battles. it has support of the nearly 4 million catholics. >> i think it's good that the information is coming out. >> yes. secrecy is what keeps the abuse going. >> back in 2007, the archdiocese was involved in a record-breaking civil settlement in the church scandal. it reached a $660 million settlement with more than 500 victims of child molestation. >>> a traffic safety program for children in the san ramon valley is kicking off its 9th year. street smarts was started by bob and carmen after their two children were killed by an impaired driver in 2003. the goal of streets smart is to educate drivers, bicyclists, and pedestrians about road safety. students participate by creating story books, a
to deficit reduction. the chairman of the president's council of economic advisers said, quote, today's report is a reminder of the importance of the need for congress to act to avoid self-inflicted wounds to the economy. on the plus side there was a jump in hiring despite the uncertainty washington faced as it flirted with going over the fiscal cliff at the end of the year. jon. jon: wendell goler at the white house krupb -fg some number crunching some numbers for us, thank you. jenna: for more of a look at the 7.9 unemployment rate we'll take a look a little bit of how the numbers really affect the average american. right now the labor department says there are nearly 12.5 million unemployed americans in this country. that doesn't include the so-called marginally attached. there's nearly 2.5 million people who are unemployed who have stopped looking for a new job, that is the number that represents them, or the 8 million people who are forced to work part time because they simply can't find full time work. overall the jobless problem is expecting close to 23 million people, and that
on many other programs. lori: the first tape showed a contraction. as you know, there are a lot of deficit hawks out there that are happy to see cuts as painful as they may be. >> the problem is, the way it is being done now is very inefficient. it is like senator warner from virginia said. you cannot portion two thirds of a ship. lori: how is all of this impacting the day today operations? >> i think for our overseas operations, we will still have funding for that. the department of defense has directed that potentially it is a sequestration that does go into effect. all maintenance for all aircraft and ships will be stopped. we are looking at a ten year recovery rate. lori: with these cuts will be u.s. still have the largest defense budget in the world? >> ironically, i think, if done properly, again, everybody needs to take somewhat of a haircut, if you will, on spending because of our economic situation. the pentagon can take some more cuts. i will not give you what that number may be. if they budgeted around 450 billion annually, which is a fairly significant cut from where we were at
to lower these deficits. connell: that means the problem is not, as you say, tomorrow's problem. what is a reasonable timetable for when the deficit and the debts are a big, big problem? >> i think in my view, it is as far as the eye can see. we are always thinking about a ten year horizon. we need to broaden not out even further. when you do that, the problem becomes a lot more acute. with a debt to gdp ratio, it is not so serious compared to other countries such as japan. it just is not as dire as the headlines suggest. connell: when do we deal with it? is there something to this argument to spend more money so we can create jobs? what is the timetable for when we actually should deal with it? >> i think that if you ask me do we have to do with the problem and the next three months or the next 30 seconds, the answer is no. the economy is growing below 2%. in that kind of an environment, you have to continue to be supportive. when you look at the payroll tax, that takes a considerable chunk off. you have to sequester that will take off an equal amount. we have to be careful not to ov
and more. you're actually spending less. we have big deficits. lori: the decrease in government spending continue to equate it to the government downsizing? many republicans are looking. spending cuts. >> a little bit. it is not dramatic. it is not the size of government is falling of a cliff, his traveling down, not up. lori: the senate approved a house plan to approve the debt ceiling and hold off on congressional pay if they don't get a budget deal for the next ten years. you say this is more of a risk and even the fiscal cliff was. >> oh, yes. the debt ceiling is a potentially large fiscal contraction like the fiscal cliff was. even bigger, actually, if you do the math. debt ceiling is you cannot borrow, so you have to balance the budget tomorrow. in addition to that, there was the kind of not very real threat that we might default on the national debt or postpone payments, so you're playing with a combination of a big fiscal contraction and the possibility of triggering a financial crisis also. lori: i want to ask you about your book. after the music stopped, but about the financial
. total tax revenues last year were 2.5 trillion. and so if you talk about trillion dollar deficits, it's not terribly difficult to look forward and doing something to really be talking about 2 trillion. >> 2030 or 2025 and it just keepts getting worst. >> it gets worse. there are 10,000 people a day turning 65 for the next 19 years. and this is the baby boom. >> this is what you do, too. as an insurance company it's all about actual aerial assumptions. so you actually know this. i think people will look at you and get glazed that's not for sure that that's going to happen. as an insurance company you need to know and you are sure. >> the demographics are clear between 2000 and 2010, so history, the age group of 55 to 64 grew by 75%. >> wow. >> that's the group that's going to move into the entitlement arena. so i'd like to think about it differently than most. rather than debating it as a taxing problem or spending problem, it's a demographic challenge that we've never faced before. we've never faced what's going to come at us -- >> and it's combined with all the expensive medicine we'
campaign will affect legislative fights in the 20 -- in the next congress. and my trust deficit ports government and the financial sector has impeded. economic recovery. -- impeded the economic recovery. than a look at american spending and savings habits. and savings habits.
the deficit under control. >> alan, talk to us about the context of the economy in light of that policy. do you think there's any risk that perhaps the fed might not step away from its policies in terms of buying assets soon enough? >> melissa, as you know, we have a long-standing practice of not commenting on the fed. the federal reserve board is an independent agency. so i'll respectfully decline. but i think what's important is that the administration and congress continue to make the steps to build a stronger economy, an economy that works better for the middle clags and helps put us on a path of a sustainable budget in a balanced way. >> let me put it another way, alan, then. do you think the economy is stronger than what wall street is forecasting right now? in the jobs numbers? >> i think the main risk we face right now is that congressional gridlock could prevent us from making a step we need to build a stronger economy, an economy that works better for the middle class. we are seeing improvements in the housing sector, since housing was ground zero for the financial crisis. i think
budget. bring down the deficits in a balanced, responsible way. >> is washington the biggest problem for the economy? >> i think clearly it is a major headwind. it spends a lot of money ineffectively. you can say that whether you're a conservative or a liberal. a source of job loss. in spite of conservative harping of government occupying too much, there's 1.5 million job shed from state and local government. a lot of those are teachers, first responders. and the inability of the government to put capital in motion and $3 trillion plus in spending in any way effectively is not doing any of us any particular good. the only happening decent right now in terms of growth tends to be what's going on ex-government and that doesn't mean that government couldn't do a lot better but washington isn't. >> let's talk about what's happening on wall street as the banner says, main street versus wall street or main street and wall street depending on your perspective. sometimes it does feel like it's a us against them scenario but the dow now over 14,000 mark. still with the millions of people look
a month but hardly enough and remember the seasonal adjuster factor affect bd i the deficit. >> one last question to you both. we did not extend the payroll tax this past year. what affect in the numbers from that? >> well, it is a little soon to really figure that out. i mean, it is true now that you mention it that the 157 in january is significantly off the pace of job creation in november and december. >> right. >> but i am quite certain that, you know, taking over 100 billion out of the 2013 economy already a bit wobbly by my lights is going to cost us on the growth and jobs side. >> yeah. one of the telling things was that in december there was a big jump in personal income because of people getting bonuses early and things like that. but spending didn't go up very much. and economists are expecting weak retail numbers for january. i think it's the seasonal adjustment factors again. my feeling is to see a drag in the third quarter. excuse me, the first quarter. and then have to be carried by the recovery of government spending because i don't think we have another drag on the econo
a priority? >> kerry has said he wants to focus on the middle east, and that has been a deficit in terms of the israeli-palestinian track. certainly, i mean, the arab spring made it much more difficult, much more complicated, but some would argue made it more necessary. >> well, yeah. the middle east is also one of the drains that can suck all the oxygen out of the room. you know, you could get involved in it and get sucked down all these different kind of rabbit holes that exist in the middle east. syria, israel, palestine, egypt, iran, iraq which could, you know, get rough, afghanistan, which is a problem. all of those things are, i guess, threads that he could pull on that could leave him not enough time to deal with the trans-atlantic relationship, to deal with china, to deal with our neighbors like mexico where their priority issues. to deal with rebuilding the international institutions that need to be rebuilt. i think he has to be a bit careful not to fall into that trap. >> finally, what about iran and whether we are going to be caught up in something that israel launches or that
's fiscal uncertainty and is doing so nervously. >> we have massive deficit, big tax increase. no apparent willingness to get government off people's backs by reducing government spending. all of that is a heavy weight on the private sector. firms around the nation are sitting on their cash instead of creating jobs. >> on wednesday, the commerce department announced economic growth fell to a minus tenth of a percent, the last three months of last year. so the chairman of the president's council of economic advisors says other indicators remain positive. >> consumer spending increased. business investment; particularly, for equipment and software was strong. residential construction was strong. we are seeing signs of that in the jobs report. >> it also showed a larger number of people dropped out of the labor force than found jobs. former administration economist says some of that is to be expected. >> the population is aging, so we expect to have a fair number of people retiring every month for the next ten years or more as the baby boom is retiring. >> actually, the conference board repor
a deficit about $2 billion, and within five yea
there in deficit and the economy slightly diminishing, and, you know, this unemployment number, they can't afford to raise the rates. gerri: well, i hear you. i don't know if they are listening. rates slowly ticking higher here. will that do anything to the housing rebound. do you worry people will step back and not buy? >> no, not yet. when you look at it realistically, buy a $275,000 house with 5% down, your monthly payment is still less than in 1987 buying $175,000 house with 5% down. we're still in a better era today for housing than we have been in a long time, and rates are at 3.5%. i mean, that is still exponentially low. people need to understand where we were, where we are, and just move. if you want to refinance, it's time now. gerri: we're showing a graph, a chart of 30-year mortgage fixed rates from all the way back to 2008-2009, and it is the steep slope south to 20 # -- 2013. it's about comical people are worried about rates popping up because most people have never seen this in their lifetimes; right? how often in your career have you financed houses at this level? >> oh, this is u
make sense whether or not we have a federal deficit. even if we have had a zero deficit. many program cuts and terminations would increase gdp and would expand individual freedom. and so the political upshot of this, and i will close on this, the clinical upshur, the fiscal conservatives always say they want to cut spending but not all of focus in recent years by fiscal conservatives in congress has been trying to impose over all restraint by putting on budget gaps, by voting for a balanced budget amendment. those sorts of cats are fine. i'm not against them but they don't reduce the underlying pressures to spend big only way to do that is to directly challenge particular programs and make the argument that particular program are harmful and wasteful, unconstitutional, unjust and unneeded. so to make lasting reform fiscal conservatives in congress need to make start making the case cost -- cuts too many programs bigger the republicans want to kill funding for big bird, for example, as candidate romney wanted to do, they got to make the case for. they got to lay out the case and push o
spending. let's reform entitlements. let's get the deficit down. big picture stuff that never really surfaced in the obama administration. >> it absolutely didn't. and again, perhaps that's a reason the council is going away. the recommendations that -- the big picture items that the council recommended were never really adopted by the obama administration, never pursued, despite the fact that these are people the president appointed and had significant business experience. and somebody again that would lend credibility to us as republicans and democrats in congress as a way to come together to get this country's economy moving. in my view, the situation has not changed. in fact, as we saw by the numbers you just reported, the lack of jobs, the slowing of the economy are still here, perhaps getting more evidence that things are going in the wrong direction, not the right direction. and all the more reason to have something to coalesce around the darn partisanship of washington, d.c. and the differences between congress. and i could say every time i say to my democratic colleagues tha
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or not tall from the standpoint of the deficit. the second point i want to make is in line with what bob said. if you were to make a typology of a foreign policy challenges of the united states, it might go something like this. there are crises that involve the of the values and the interest and the interests but not the values and both with some overlap. we pursue our interests hopefully not the point that we are right of a moral crisis that we generate. there are certain challenges which do not seem to involve our interests very much but to bring our values and to question and the classic example of that would have been rwanda and i will get back to that in a moment and then there was a majority of foreign policy challenges. syria and given the magnitude of the humanitarian crisis, the strategic importance of the country there is no greater blow that can be dealt to iran at this moment than the fall of the assad regime from there is no greater blow that can be dealt to hezbollah are dealt to hamas the in the fall of the regime. if one wants to be a coldhearted realist and put together of th
a $16 trillion deficit, 51 million people on food stamps. our culture is an entitlement culture and yet we're going after 13 million people who have an immigration problem. hey, i'm all for vetting them. how about reverse discrimination for once in this country. if we're going to demand exceptionalism, we should have it towards the immigrants whether they come legally or illegally and also go back to americans who are u.s. citizens. >> are you talking about expelling americans? >> i'm all for demotion of citizenship. i agree with you. it may be extreme. but here's my point. how many of you. >> keep it short. >> how many of you have a trouble in a third world country and you come back to america and have a different experience about exceptionalism. what about reverse immigration? >> i do not support the deportation of american citizens but if that were to be a policy, what you would do is save hundreds of billions of dollars a year in the welfare state because immigrants are less likely to use welfare each when naturalized and americans who are poor. that's an interesting result of that.
. president obama wants to preserve more spending, wants to cut the deficit by racing taxes. there are two different ideas of how to handle the economy. president obama won the election. the democratic party won the senate, and the republicans even lost a few seats in the house, so the democrats ar have just hd more momentum lately because they won. >> so what does that mean for us? >> well, it means -- it means that republicans are going to be fighting on the federal spening part but likely we're going to live in an economy that's structured according to president obama's wishes for the next four years because he got reelected. >> byron york, nice to see you from san francisco. always appreciate it. >> thank you, jenna. >>> the white house reaction to today's job report is this. the president's economic advisors saying critical investments are needed to promote job creation. that's part of the game plan. is more spending the answer here? former ohio democratic congressman and fox news contributor now dennis accuse k. spend what and spend it where? >> first of all, we can't be talking abou
actually get through to a long-term deal. president obama has proposed a $4 trillion deficit deal. one that is a balanced approach, which we had a debate over whether we wanted balance, through revenue and cuts or whether we wanted a cuts-only approach which the republicans proposed. and the american people decided they wanted president obama's vision. and that's the path we need to continue down so we can provide that certainty. but -- >> let me ask -- >> republicans, i agree, aren't interested in that. >> let me ask you about some other things that obviously have been front and center, and vice president biden met with senate democrats yesterday to keep the pressure on to get something done on gun control. here's part of what he said. i'm not saying there's an absolute consensus on all these things, but there is a sea change. a sea change in the attitudes of the american people. and three new polls show almost complete support, almost 100% support, for background checks in virginia, new jersey, pennsylvania. is this where we're most likely to see some legislation in this area? >> you
. the president has also been slammed for ignoring his deficit commission." so is he at odds with eric cantor? is he right? >> well i've chose on it stay out of the politics and try to focus on policy and particularly try to focus on building bipartisan support for policies around entrepreneurialship. the reason we're the leading competent in the world isn't the work of an accident but entrepreneurs. focusing on people and watching that, ultimately in the action of playing companies but washington plays a role making it easier to invest, improving access to talent around immigration, improving access to capital with crowd funding and ipos with the jobs act, it only can happen in a bipartisan way so i understand kind of the debates and the fun when people go back and forth with the talking points. the reality is republicans and democrats have come together around entrepreneurship over the past couple years, we need to continue to build progress with or without a jobs council and that's what i'll continue to try to help facilitate. >> steve case thank you for joining us this morning. we appreci
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